Politics

Impeachment Vote: House Expected to Vote on Impeaching Trump Again

For the second time during his presidency.

The House of Representatives is expected to vote today on whether or not President Donald Trump will be officially impeached for a second time. The January 13 vote is on a single article of impeachment for the “incitement of insurrection” related to the January 6 attempted fascist coup at the U.S. Capitol. Trump has only a week left in office before the January 20 inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden, but the move could have major consequences for Trump’s political future.

The text of the article of impeachment specifically cites section three of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which specifically prohibits anyone from holding civic office who has “engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the [United States], or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof.” As the Nation explained, even without impeachment, that could be used to block Trump from ever holding public office again, barring him from another presidential term or serving in Congress.

Trump was previously impeached in December 2019 for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. In February 2020, that impeachment ended in acquittal, thanks to the then GOP-controlled Senate. But now it’s unclear if Trump will enjoy the same partisan support that kept him in office last time around.

As CNN congressional correspondent Manu Raju reported Tuesday, House Republicans leaders aren’t pressuring GOP members to vote against the impeachment but instead allowing them to vote their conscience. On Tuesday, Representative James Katko (D-NY) became the first House Republican to announce he would vote to impeach Trump, Syracuse.com reported. Liz Cheney, the number three Republican in the House, soon joined him. Then, three others — Adam Kinzinger, Fred Upton, and Jaime Herrera Beutler — all added their names to the list of Republicans supporting impeachment, bringing the running total to five. CNN reported that several others could do the same.

ABC News reported that as Trump prepared to head to Texas for a visit to the border wall Tuesday, he called impeachment “a continuation of the greatest witch hunt in the history of politics,” said it was “absolutely ridiculous” and a “terrible thing,” and that it’s “causing tremendous anger.”

Apparently, some congressional Republicans are worried about what supporting the impeachment effort could mean for them because of the influence of Trump’s fervent forces. As Politico reported Monday, members of Congress from both parties are facing increasing threats and hearing from constituents that there is support for the January 6 insurrection.

If Trump is officially impeached for a second time, he would then stand trial in the Senate again — though the timing and the outcome of that feels much less certain than last time.

Want more from Teen Vogue? Check this out: Presidential Impeachment, Explained

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